Stories of plagiarism / theories of writing: How public cases of plagiarism reveal circulating theories of writing (2019)

Rhetoric and Writing Studies have long attempted to bend plagiarism complaints toward theories of writing and learning. Media coverage and institutional discourse, on the other hand, continue framing plagiarism as an isolated, individual problem (Adler-Kassner, Anson, & Howard, 2008). And so we find plagiarism exhaustively covered and still exhausting.

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Sexual Harassment, Dirty Underwear, and Coffee Bar Hipsters: Welcome to the Virtual Writing Center (2019)

It was during summer 2015, my first month into being newly in charge of the University of Georgia’s writing centers (WCs), that I met X through our synchronous online consultation (SOC) service. Based on his pre-filled appointment questionnaire, I knew that he was a social sciences graduate student, that he wanted help revising his first rejected academic article.

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Underground Hellos: Signaling Welcome to Marginalized Writers in the South (2019)

In our undergraduate training course, like many others, consultants-to-be learn about the role of the writing center as an institutional middle-ground, a liminal space between teachers and students, the university and the individuals within it. University-sponsored “peer” tutoring, of course, depends on situating ourselves as such. However, writing center practitioners’ view of ourselves and our work, and the image we present to our consultants-in-training, can be very different from the preconceived images that incoming writers have of the writing center.

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Going Professional: Writing Centers’ Challenges and Possibilities in Working with Emerging Online Professional Graduate Student Programs (2019)

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  • Post published:March 9, 2019
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This project demonstrated the urgency of developing writing center pedagogies for adult professionals—those working in fields requiring higher education, usually a college degree, and including formal standards of practice—in contrast to either traditional college student writers or graduate students in scholarly fields.

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A Big Cupboard: Developing a Tutor’s Manual of Model Asynchronous Feedback for Multilingual Writers (2019)

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  • Post published:February 9, 2019
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This article describes a replicable process for developing a reference manual of model asynchronous written responses to errors in the writing of multilingual writers for the purpose of tutor training and development.

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Applying the Technological, Pedagogical and Content Knowledge (TPACK) Framework to Enhance Tutor Training and Writing Instruction in Online Writing Centers (2019)

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  • Post published:February 9, 2019
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The Technological, Pedagogical, and Content Knowledge (TPACK) model can be applied to tutor training in online writing centers to help tutors develop the skills required to meet individual student learning needs.

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What Makes Tutors Tick?: Exploring Motives and Experiences in the JALT Writers’ Peer Support Group (PSG) (2019)

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  • Post published:February 9, 2019
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This article presents results from a survey of volunteer tutors who provided feedback to clients on in-process papers that clients shared with the PSG. Findings illuminated tutors' motivations, foci of feedback for writers, and challenges of peer-readership through online collaboration.

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